Frequently Asked Questions

Below is a list of the most frequently asked questions regarding the Tennis Play and Stay campaign and the supporting programmes.

What is Tennis Play and Stay?

The Tennis Play and Stay campaign was established in 2007 to increase tennis participation worldwide, attracting (play) and retaining (stay) more people to the sport. Click here for more information.


What is Tennis10s?

Tennis10s is tennis for players aged 10-and-under, played on smaller courts with slower Red, Orange and Green balls. Click here for more information.


What is Tennis Xpress?

Tennis Xpress is an active and dynamic introduction to tennis for starter adult players using the slower balls. Click here for more information.


What is the ITN?

The International Tennis Number (ITN) is an international tennis number that represents a player’s general level of play. Click here for more information.


What is the difference between the slower balls and the regular Yellow ball?

Why use slower balls?


What are the three stages of Tennis10s?

The three stages of Tennis10s are:

  • Stage 3 - Red (5-8 years)
  • Stage 2 - Orange (8-10 years)
  • Stage 1 - Green (9-10 years)

Click here for more information.


What is the new rule of 10-and-under competition?

In effect from 1 January 2012, the ITF Rules of Tennis state that 10-and-under competitions worldwide can no longer be played using a regular ‘Yellow’ tennis ball, with the mandatory use of slower ‘Red’, ‘Orange’ or ‘Green’ balls on the appropriate size court. Click here for more information.


10-and-under Eligibility

The new ITF rule change for 10-and-under competition affects all levels of tournaments for this age group. The 10-and-under competitions age eligibility system in each country will be determined by the national federation concerned as some nations will use calendar age and some will use birth date to determine the age eligibility to participate in these events. Click here for more information.


Where can I find out more information regarding marking Red and Orange courts?

Click here to access the Resource section and to download the Tennis10s Marking Red and Orange Courts Guidance manual.


What competitions can be played on courts that have been marked with smaller court blended court lines?

The ITF fully supports the use of permanent blended lines to mark smaller tennis courts. Blended Lines are officially allowed according the Rules of Tennis for national based competitions, but not for ITF Pro Circuits, NEC Wheelchair Tour, ITF Juniors and Seniors events, and Davis Cup and Fed Cup events. There is currently a two-year experiment taking place during 2012 and 2013 where blended lines are being trialled at some higher level competition.

The ITF have a "Tennis10s: Marking Red & Orange Courts - A Guidance Manual" that provides information for federations, tennis clubs / facilities and for coaches, with how smaller tennis courts can be marked on existing or prospective new tennis courts. Click here to access the Tennis10s Marking Red and Orange Courts Guidance Manual.


Where can slower balls and other supporting equipment be purchased from?

Please click here to purchase slower balls direct from the Tennis Play and Stay website. To browse specific ball supplier web stores, please click here to access the Equipment section on the tenisplayandstay.com website.


Are there doubles lines for 8-and-under courts?

8-and-unders can either play on the Red 36-42ft (10.77-12.8m) court which have no doubles lines, or on the Orange 58-60ft (17.68018.29m) court which do inlcude the doubles lines. Click here to access the Tennis10s Marking Red and Orange Courts Guidance Manual.


Is the Green ball now a regular ball for competitive play?

Following extensive consultation with major member nations and the Tennis Industry Association (TIA), the ITF has approved a two-year trial rule for the Green ball as an optional ball for all levels of competition commencing 2012, as approved by the ITF Rules of Tennis Committee and by the ITF Board of Directors’ meeting in November 2011. Click here for more information.

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